top of page

Acerca de

iStock-929819832.jpg

Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS)

Paulsson, Inc. provides surveying, monitoring and characterization of high temperature geothermal reservoirs at temperatures up to 600°F (300°C), and pressures up to 25,000 psi (172 MPa) using its proprietary optical vector seismic, acoustic and pressure sensors and proprietary 3D time-lapse processing and imaging.

SURVEYING

Surveying high temperature geothermal reservoirs typically involves a combination of geological, geophysical, and geochemical techniques to identify and characterize the subsurface structures and properties that control the location, size, and potential of geothermal resources. The process typically involves several steps:

1. Site selection: The first step is to identify potential areas where high temperature geothermal resources may exist. This is typically done using geological maps, surface geothermal manifestations (such as hot springs or geysers), and other geophysical data.

2. Geophysical surveys: Geophysical surveys are then conducted to identify and characterize subsurface structures and properties that may be associated with geothermal resources. This may include techniques such as gravity surveys, magnetic surveys, seismic surveys, and electrical resistivity surveys.

3. Drilling: Once potential geothermal resources are identified, exploratory drilling is conducted to confirm the existence of a reservoir and to obtain data on reservoir properties, such as temperature, pressure, and fluid chemistry.

4. Production testing: After drilling, production testing is conducted to determine the potential flow rate of the geothermal reservoir and to evaluate the long-term sustainability of the resource.

5. Reservoir modeling: Based on the data collected from drilling and production testing, reservoir modeling is used to estimate the size and potential of the geothermal resource and to design an optimal production strategy.

Overall, surveying high temperature geothermal reservoirs is a complex and interdisciplinary process that requires expertise in geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and engineering. The goal is to identify and characterize geothermal resources that can be developed into a sustainable source of clean energy.

MONITORING

Monitoring high temperature geothermal reservoirs is a crucial part of managing and maintaining the sustainability of geothermal energy production. The process involves regularly collecting and analyzing data from various sources to ensure that the reservoir is operating within safe and sustainable parameters. The steps involved in monitoring high temperature geothermal reservoirs typically include:

1. Continuous monitoring: High temperature geothermal reservoirs are typically monitored continuously using a variety of sensors, including temperature, pressure, and flow meters. This allows operators to track changes in the reservoir over time and detect any potential issues early.

2. Geochemical monitoring: Geochemical monitoring involves analyzing the chemical composition of fluids from the reservoir, including dissolved gases, minerals, and isotopes. This can help identify changes in reservoir conditions, such as changes in temperature, pressure, or fluid chemistry, which may indicate changes in the reservoir's productivity or sustainability.

3. Seismic monitoring: Seismic monitoring involves recording and analyzing the vibrations and waves generated by earthquakes, human activity, or fluid movements within the reservoir. This can help detect any potential seismic hazards, such as induced earthquakes, and ensure that the reservoir is operating safely.

4. Modeling: Reservoir modeling involves using mathematical models to simulate reservoir behavior and predict future changes. This can help operators optimize production strategies, predict potential problems, and ensure the long-term sustainability of the resource.

5. Periodic well testing: Periodic well testing involves shutting down the well and measuring the pressure and temperature response. This can help evaluate the performance of the well and identify any potential issues that may require maintenance or repair.

Overall, monitoring high temperature geothermal reservoirs requires a multi-disciplinary approach that includes expertise in geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and engineering. The goal is to ensure that the geothermal resource is operating safely and sustainably while maximizing energy production.

CHARACTERIZATION

The characterization of high temperature geothermal reservoirs involves a comprehensive study of the physical, chemical, and geological properties of the subsurface reservoir to understand its structure, behavior, and potential for geothermal energy production. The process of characterizing high temperature geothermal reservoirs typically involves the following steps:

1. Geologic characterization: This step involves collecting and analyzing data on the geological structures and properties of the subsurface reservoir, such as rock types, structures, and stratigraphy. This can be done through geological mapping, geophysical surveys, and drilling.

2. Hydrological characterization: The hydrological characterization involves studying the fluid behavior of the subsurface reservoir, including the flow rate, temperature, pressure, and chemistry of the fluids. This can be done through monitoring wells, geophysical surveys, and geochemical analysis.

3. Reservoir modeling: Reservoir modeling is a crucial step in characterizing high temperature geothermal reservoirs, where mathematical models are used to simulate and predict the behavior of the reservoir under different operating conditions. This can help identify potential areas for geothermal energy production, estimate the reservoir's productivity, and optimize production strategies.

4. Production testing: Production testing involves drilling production wells and measuring the flow rate and temperature of the fluids to determine the potential energy output of the reservoir. This can help evaluate the suitability of the reservoir for geothermal energy production and identify any potential issues that may require maintenance or repair.

5. Sustainable assessment: Sustainable assessment is the final step in characterizing high temperature geothermal reservoirs. It involves evaluating the environmental impact of geothermal energy production and ensuring that the resource is used in a sustainable manner. This can involve evaluating the potential for induced seismicity, managing geothermal fluids, and minimizing the impact of geothermal energy production on the local ecosystem.

 

Overall, the characterization of high temperature geothermal reservoirs is a complex process that requires a multi-disciplinary approach, including expertise in geology, geophysics, hydrology, and engineering. The goal is to understand the subsurface reservoir's structure and behavior to maximize the sustainable production of geothermal energy.

Let’s Work Together

Get in touch so we can start working together.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Instagram
Thanks for submitting!
bottom of page