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Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)

Paulsson sensor technologies can characterize and monitor geological Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) processes and facilities in ultra-high resolution. It can also detect small casing leaks, and geological interbed gas flows, as well as monitor the structural integrity of critical equipment with extreme sensitivity and precision.

(CCS) WHAT IS IT?

Geological Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a process that involves capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial processes or power generation, then storing them deep underground in geological formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs, saline aquifers, or un-minable coal seams. 

Characterizing geological CCS processes and facilities in ultra-high resolution means obtaining detailed and precise information about the geological formations where CO2 is being injected and stored, as well as the injection and monitoring facilities used to manage the process. This level of resolution requires using advanced technologies such as seismic imaging, microseismic monitoring, and well logging to create highly detailed 3D models of the subsurface.

By characterizing geological CCS processes and facilities in ultra-high resolution, scientists and engineers can better understand the behavior of CO2 within the subsurface formations, as well as the potential risks and benefits of CCS. This information is critical for designing safe and effective CCS projects, as well as for monitoring and verifying the long-term storage of CO2. Additionally, this level of detail can help optimize injection and monitoring strategies, improve operational efficiency, and reduce costs associated with CCS.

THE PROCESS

The Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) process can be broken down into several key steps:

1. Carbon Capture: This step involves capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial processes or power generation plants before they are released into the atmosphere. This can be achieved through several methods such as post-combustion capture, pre-combustion capture, or oxy-fuel combustion.

2. Compression: The captured CO2 is compressed to a high-pressure state for easier transport and storage.

​3. Transport: The compressed CO2 is then transported via pipelines or other means to the storage site.

4. Injection: The CO2 is injected deep underground into geological formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs, saline aquifers, or un-minable coal seams. The CO2 is stored in these formations, which act as natural geological permanent containers.

5. Monitoring: The injection site is continuously monitored to ensure that the CO2 is being stored safely and securely. Monitoring can involve several techniques such as seismic imaging, microseismic, pressure and temperature monitoring, and fluid sampling.

 

6. Verification: After injection, the stored CO2 is verified through monitoring and modeling to ensure that it remains safely stored and does not leak into the atmosphere or water sources.

Overall, the CCS process aims to capture and store carbon dioxide emissions, preventing them from entering the atmosphere and contributing to climate change.

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